Break Every Chain (Monologue)

The Bible is God’s love story to written to us

Let’s begin with the bad news

All have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God

Each of us have been born in sin, with a sin nature

We are blinded in sin.

Scripture tells us that men love darkness rather than light

 

We have spurned God’s law

We are bound and shackled in the chains of sin

Chains of pride, selfishness

Chains of envy and jealousy

Sinful chains of lust

Chains of addiction, laziness, indifference, ambivalence

 

Our transgressions are many

Our sins outnumber the grains of sand

We stand helpless and broken

Our situation is bleak

If you, O Lord, kept a record of wrongs, who could stand?

But with you there is forgiveness, therefore you are feared

 

Here is the good news

There is power in the name of Jesus

There is power in the precious blood of Jesus

That can cleanse every sin, every stain, every addiction.

He died so that you might live

Repent and turn to God

so that your sins may be wiped out

and times of refreshing may come from the Lord

 

There is no one too far gone

There is no one beyond the reach of Almighty God

Jesus can break the chains of sin and death

He can shatter every chain that binds you

Turn to him, trust in him today

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The Rich King Became Poor

“For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that you by his poverty might become rich.” (2 Cor 8:9)

The Lord Jesus is rich. Rich is a reference to Christ’s preexistent status as the eternal Son of God in heaven. Jesus is the Creator of all, the Lord of all nations, First born of all Creation, the Preeminent One. He is the precious Son of God – fully God and fully man. He is the Name above all names, King of kings and Lord of lords. Jesus Christ is the greatest, highest, Holiest, richest, Preeminent King.

The Lord Jesus Christ became poor. Poor is a reference to the humility of Christ’s incarnation, including His death. This is the truth of the Incarnation – God became man. Jesus took on flesh and skin. Christ took on our humanity. He was tempted in every way that we are, yet was without sin. He faced the hardships of this cold world. He felt the painful effects of sin’s curse on the earth. He had no home. He had no place to lay His head. He humbled Himself as a servant.

Rich King Jesus became the poorest of the poor. He suffered and died the worst kind of death. He was beaten, bruised and ridiculed. He died a criminal’s death. A crown of thorns was placed upon His head. Nails were driven into His hands and feet. He was lifted high upon a cross. He suffered in anguish as the sins of the world were placed upon Him. He shed His blood as a ransom for many.

This truth is for you: Christ became poor so you could become rich. What does rich mean in this passage? The apostle Paul is not speaking of our earthly health, wealth and prosperity. He is not speaking of physical money, gold, stocks, bonds or IRAs. Paul is speaking of spiritual wealth: salvation and all the benefits that flow from Christ’s death and resurrection.

Ephesians 1:3 says, “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places.” Those of us who trust in Christ become spiritually rich. We are blessed with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places. We could spend hours recounting the many blessings in Christ: salvation, forgiveness of sin, removal of guilt, clean conscience, changed heart and life, substantial healing, protection from evil, wisdom in decisions, provision of our needs, comfort in times of trouble, hope that endures, no fear of death and the promise of eternal life in heaven. What a great exchange this is! The Lord Jesus became poor, so that you would become spiritually rich.

Christ shed His blood to pay the penalty for your sins and mine. He took our sin and shame, so that we could be forgiven. He was forsaken that we might be forgiven. He was condemned that we might be accepted. He died that we might live. Forgiveness is freely offered to all who repent and trust in Jesus. This hope is for you. Christ became poor so you could become rich.

The Christian Response to Homosexuality in Post-Christian America

Many churches fail in their approach of addressing homosexuality. The liberal response embraces and celebrates sin. The fundamental response typically shuns and condemns sinners. The way of Jesus is neither of these approaches. The Christian response speaks truth in love and offers Gospel hope to sinners.

Here are 12 considerations to keep in mind in this day and age:

  1. Scripture is clear. Homosexual practice and behavior is sin. Both the Old and New Testaments are crystal clear on this issue. It is interesting that Jesus never mentions homosexuality, but he warned against sexual sin (porneia). Homosexuality was not tolerated in Palestine, so Jesus did not need to address this issue specifically. The apostle Paul warns against homosexuality on several occasions as he writes to Gentile churches.
  1. We have a minority view. The clear Biblical stance on homosexuality is now a minority view in America. Over half of Americans approve of gay marriage. There is no longer a prevalent Judeo-Christian worldview and ethic in our country. Younger generations are more tolerant and heavily influenced by friends, peers, media, and culture. Most Americans do not care what the Bible says about homosexuality. Christians thumping the Bible is falling on deaf ears. Satan is at work and having a heyday with this issue. While Christians must stand on Biblical truth, we also need to stay current on research and present rational arguments for our perspective. We also need to understand that most homosexuals in our culture tend to tie their identity to this inward struggle. This is a controversial, intricate, and challenging issue to unpack, understand, and address.
  1. We must become Christ’s ambassadors. Our nation no longer legislates morality in regards to adultery, divorce, homosexual practice, and abortion. We probably cannot legislate morality regarding gay marriage in post-Christian America. Even if we did, laws cannot change hearts. John MacArthur says, “Overly politically-active Christians make enemies with the lost.” He writes, “Rather than concentrating on political issues and debates, believers should be consumed with their responsibility as Christ’s ambassadors. That is the church’s mandate. When other priorities and pursuits crowd out the Great Commission, both the message and the mission get confused.” In our efforts to be responsible, voting, politically-active Christians, we can easily lose sight of eternal Gospel priorities. Satan is our enemy, not people. Homosexuals are not our enemy. We need to adjust our expectations, prepare for persecution, pray for revival, and become Christ’s ambassadors.
  1. This world is not our home. Our priorities must shift from an earthly focus to a heavenly focus. What is now seen on earth is only temporal, and what is unseen is eternal. America is not “God’s special country.” No country has ever been perfect or fully Christian. All nations are corrupt, and no nation will last. The earth will one day be destroyed. The Christian is not to ignore the political arena of the world nor his cultural identity for that would be irresponsible and disrespectful, but earthly politics and patriotism must be seen as secondary. It is essential that a believer prioritize the kingdom of God and the gospel of Jesus Christ. Living as an alien and stranger on earth, the Christian life is one of expectation and yearning for heaven—the better country to come.
  1. Never enjoy confronting homosexuality. There should be no applause or rejoicing in condemnation of sin. All too often, our preaching against homosexuality is a disgusting spectacle. Older generations tend to be too harsh when addressing homosexuality. The heavy duty of preaching against sin should be discharged with reluctance. Pastors should take a fatherly approach when addressing this sin, as if pursuing a wayward child. There is no joy in confronting homosexuality. We should find this difficult and heavy. We must shed compassionate tears for those who struggle with homosexuality. We must be humble and broken.

In the book, God in the Dock, C.S. Lewis presents some dangers in preaching national repentance. He writes: “Is it not, then, the duty of the Church to preach national repentance? I think it is. But the office—like many others—can be profitably discharged only by those who discharge it with reluctance. We know that a man may have to ‘hate’ his mother for the Lord’s sake. The sight of a Christian rebuking his mother, though tragic, may be edifying; but only if we are quite sure that he has been a good son and that, in his rebuke, spiritual zeal is triumphing, not without agony, over strong natural affection. The moment there is reason to suspect he enjoys rebuking her—that he believes himself to be rising above the natural level while he is still, in reality, groveling below it in the unnatural—the spectacle becomes merely disgusting. The hard sayings of our Lord are wholesome to those only who find them hard.”

  1. Homosexuality should not be singled out as the only sin or the worst sin. The apostle Paul mentions homosexuality within lists of many sins (1 Cor 6:9-11; 1 Tim 1:9-10; Rom 1:18-32). We should be honest that we are sinners and each of us are battling different sins. We should speak of homosexuality as one of many serious sins including premarital sex, adultery, pornography, etc. 
  1. Hope must be offered. The apostle Paul wrote to the Corinthian church regarding homosexuality as something of their past that had been washed and cleansed. If Christians in Corinth could be cleansed of former homosexual sin, there is hope that anyone can be washed, sanctified, and forgiven (1 Cor 6:11). We do not write anyone off. There are people attending your church every Sunday who are struggling with same sex attraction and homosexuality. Many are carrying pain and guilt. They need to know that they are accepted even as they struggle with this issue. All sinners need encouragement to struggle against sin, no matter what kind. Individuals should not be penalized in the church for struggling with same-sex attraction while living a life of holiness. We offer real Gospel hope to sinners knowing there is substantial healing in Jesus Christ.
  1. Love must be paramount. Jesus said we will be known by our love (John 13:35). Remember that it was God’s kindness that led us to repentance (Rom 2:4). Love and kindness must be communicated in every conversation on this issue.
  1. Every word counts. Always be ready to give an answer (1 Pet 3:15). Our words can be easily misunderstood and twisted. Jesus said we will give an account for every careless word (Matt 12:36). We must guard our words carefully, especially in this day and age.
  1. There is a time to be silent. Pray for wisdom when to speak and when to be silent. There were times that Jesus did not open his mouth (Isa 53:7; Acts 8:32; Matt 27:12; 1 Pet 2:23). Sometimes we talk too much. Jesus cautioned Christians to “be wise as serpents and innocent as doves” (Matthew 10:16). The apostle Paul recommends that we not judge those outside the church (1 Cor 5:12-13).
  1. Some of our approaches are different.Christians are forced to make difficult decisions when close friends or family members pursue an active homosexual lifestyle. When invited to attend a gay wedding, a Christian has to prayerfully consider his response. There should be opportunity at some point to verbally speak truth in love. Once the Gospel has been shared and concerns voiced, it is important to show respect and love. Some would argue that attending a wedding would show complete support and approval of the marriage. Others would argue that avoiding the wedding would cause offense and irreparably damage a family relationship. These are difficult decisions. Each individual must count the cost. There are repercussions to either approach. Godly men and women have freedom in Christ to prayerfully approach these hard decisions and make wise choices. Be respectful of those who may have a different approach than your own.
  1. Do your best to avoid hypocrisy. Yes, the church is full of hypocrites. None of us have arrived. We must admit that some of the accusations we receive are well deserved. Our attitudes and words often cause unnecessary barriers. There are times to set clear boundaries. Pastors and clergy have to draw real lines when officiating weddings. If it is possible, as much as it depends on you, try to live at peace with all men (Rom 12:18). In our efforts to stand for the sanctity of marriage, we must be careful to not show partiality and favoritism. Homosexuals are sinners like us created in the image of God who are worthy of dignity and respect. Christians in society should not have a vendetta to refuse business and services to all homosexuals. For example, suppose you own a cake-making business. If you refuse to make a cake for a gay wedding, do you also refuse to make a cake for those who had premarital sex? Try to be consistent. Otherwise, you are showing partiality and favoritism to “certain sinners.” This does not communicate love. This shows hypocrisy and gives Christians a bad name. Philip Yancey’s new book, Vanishing Grace, laments how Christians have lost respect, influence and reputation in our culture. Some of the disdain we receive from the lost is self-inflicted.

Bible Study Questions

3 Basic Questions for Bible Study:
1. What? (What does it say?)
2. So what? (Why does it matter?)
3. Now What? (How does it apply to my life?)
Further Questions for Bible study:
1. What does this passage say?
2. What is the main point of the text (author’s intent)?
3. What does this passage say about God?
4. What does this passage say about Man?
5. How does this passage relate to the Gospel?
6. What Christ-centered Truths stand out?
7. What sin did God convict you of? (Repent, Pray, & Commit to Change)
8. What commands of God were you reminded of?
9. What promises of God were you reminded of?
10. What further questions do you have for future study?
Questions to Discuss After a Sermon:
1. What was the main point (or were the main points) of the sermon?
2. What encouraged/edified you the most in the sermon?
3. What did you learn?
4. Did you disagree or have concern with any of the sermon?
5. As time allows, discuss the 13 Bible Study Questions listed above.

Advent Devotional eBook

Our Providence worship staff is pleased to present an Advent Book. This devotional guide is divided into the four weeks that lead up to Christmas. Advent begins on Sunday, December 2. Each week focuses on a theme relating to Christ’s first coming. There are daily devotional readings written by our pastors for Monday through Thursday. At the end of the week, there is a selected passage followed by questions for reflection. We pray this is a helpful resource for personal and family devotions this Christmas season.

The PDF eBook is available at: http://www.pray.org/media/publications/publications/

This is a great opportunity to slow down during the busy Christmas season and meditate upon the wonder and miracle of Christ’s coming. It is also a great opportunity to lead your family in a weekly Bible study relating to the season. Christmas is filled with song, food and spending time with family inside and outside the home. This devotional guide includes suggestions for these items as well. Throughout each week, you will see Christmas recipes for the dinner table, familiar Christmas carols that retell of Christ’s miraculous birth, craft ideas for the home and for the kids, and dates and times for local Christmas events.

Special thanks to our worship intern, Michael Carter, for spearheading this project.

May Jesus Christ be our treasure this Advent season and all year long. God bless and keep you.

Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs

Words set to music are extremely powerful and influential. D. L. Moody said: “I believe that music is one of the most powerful agents for good or for evil.” Music with sinful words and messages pervade minds and influence hearts. Scripture encourages believers to “set their minds on the things of the Spirit” in Romans 8:5 and “on things above” in Colossians 3:2. Philippians 4:8 says, “Whatever is true, honorable, just, pure, lovely, commendable, excellent or worthy of praise, think about such things.” Considering these passages, it is clear that human minds are impressionable. Even music can influence one’s thinking and can prove quite harmful to any individual. Christians must guard their hearts and minds through prayer and listening to what is good.

Words are influential and can be used for good or evil. James 3:9-10 gives a reminder that a person’s mouth and words can both praise God and curse men. Words can either build up or tear down. God-honoring church music can impact faith in profound ways.

In Ephesians 5 and Colossians 3, the apostle Paul exhorts believers to sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to God and one another. These three musical terms deserve to be looked at closely. The word psalm originally meant “a striking or twitching with the fingers (on musical strings) and a sacred song, sung to musical accompaniment.” This term, psalm, has historically been understood as the one hundred fifty psalms appearing in the Psalter and passages of Scripture set to music. The book of Psalms is filled with honest prayers, adoration, praise, and worship of God.

While the psalm is praise taken directly from Scripture, the hymn is a song of praise written by believers. The word hymn means “a song of praise addressed to God.” Songs of adoration and praise are mentioned in the Bible, beginning in Exodus 15 and concluding in Revelation 15. There is record of Jesus singing hymns with the disciples in Matthew 26:30 and Mark 14:26. Also, Paul and Silas sang hymns to God while in prison as seen in Acts 16:25.

W. Robert Godfrey, President and Professor of Church History at Westminster Theological Seminary, says that most of the songs people today call the “old hymns of the faith . . . are actually hymns written in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.” So, what did church music sound like long ago? How did the ancient church praise God in song? Godfrey admits, “The evidence to answer such a question is very limited and not really clear.”

W. Godfrey also pinpoints some overlap in the use of the words psalm and hymn: “The terms psalm and hymn have often been used interchangeably in some ancient writings and in the New Testament. In Matthew 26:30 we read that after the Last Supper, Jesus and His disciples sang a hymn before they went out. That hymn was almost certainly Psalm 118. In 1 Corinthians 14:26 the reference to a psalm is most likely a song inspired by the Spirit in the Corinthian church.”

Although this can be confusing, one thing is clear: both psalms and hymns from any era are songs directed to God.

Worship music should involve not only psalms and hymns, but also spiritual songs. These are expressions of biblical truth that allow a congregation to address one another in song. This final category of spiritual songs is a general term that includes songs of personal testimony, encouragement, faith, and response.

The local church should not be afraid of these terms: psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs. Christians often categorize church music by the groupings of praise choruses and hymns. Many today consider hymns the traditional, staple songs of deep truth that are found in classic hymnals. This is not necessarily the case. As seen earlier, the word hymn is defined as a song of praise to God. There are many songs in the hymnal that do not fit this description. For example, Tell Me the Stories of Jesus, In the Garden, and Stand Up For Jesus are typically known as hymns, but are not directed to God. These should instead be deemed spiritual songs. I would also argue that only songs of praise directed to God should truly be considered hymns. This would mean the worship song from Australia, Shout to the Lord, is more than just a worship chorus. It is a hymn and should be considered so. The local church should get a handle on these three terms and use them accurately.

Paul makes the declaration in 1 Corinthians 14:15, “I will sing with the spirit and with the understanding also.” Church leadership should remember to inform their congregation about non-familiar terms or ideas, the history of hymn writings, Scriptural consistency, and application of the text. Warren Wiersbe says, “Our goal in singing is to lay hold of God’s truth and be nourished by it.” Song texts should be relevant and understandable to the audience. Worship music should assist, not distract, a congregation in worship of God.

Burdened for Some Trends in American Church Worship

I have a friend who is writing a research paper about prayers of lament. She is arguing that the lament is a valid, important, missing element in American worship. I agree with her premise overall. From what I’m seeing, the majority of large, urban churches in America that are aggressive towards church growth include joyful praise, pop/rock style, upbeat songs (at least to begin the service), and a lack of somber lament and confession.

American music has been greatly influenced by Europe, Africa and other cultures in the last several hundred years. Joy and praise in worship are not just an American phenomenon. Latino and African culture tend to be quite joyful, passionate and expressive. Asian cultures can often be more reserved and contemplative. There is something to be appreciated in every culture. Each changing generation both gains and loses something.

I’m not that concerned with changes in music style which are to be expected over time, but I am burdened for the lack of prayer and the content of our liturgy and songs. Corporate prayer, laments, and confession of sin seem to be missing aspects of American church worship. My dad travelled to American evangelical churches extensively over the last 5-6 years, and he rarely heard churches pray; he mainly heard songs and sermons. Church worship gatherings should include more than just sermons and songs of praise. There needs to be an emphasis on the ordinances and sacred actions of the New Testament.

The Lord’s Table (communion) in American churches tends to have a somber, serious tone (which is not true of all cultures) and confession of sin. During my time in Africa, communion was experienced as a joyful celebration of the resurrection. So, this aspect of somber confession is often expressed in the American church during communion (about once a month in my circles).

I would encourage the wisdom of incorporating more prayer, laments and confession of sin in corporate worship. It is appropriate to come to God in prayer as we are . . . honest and broken. Early church liturgies included lengthy confession of sin. There is much to be learned from their practice and example. You can explore some early church liturgies at: https://joshberrus.wordpress.com/2007/04/24/early-liturgies/.

All Biblical elements in worship are crucial and important. The early church in Acts 2 was devoted to the apostles’ teaching, prayer, fellowship, breaking of bread, and all Biblical ordinances and practices in corporate worship. Believers should respond with sacrificial devotion in all the Biblical elements. Christians are to worship God with passion and zeal through Scripture reading, prayer, confession, giving, communion, baptism, testimony, music, preaching, serving, and all Biblical practices for the aim of the glory of God.

Here are some suggestions for worship planning:
https://joshberrus.wordpress.com/2008/11/21/worship-planning/